New pattern in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine : the Everyday Dress

BLOG HEADER EVERYDAY DRESS.jpg

I am very excited to be popping onto the blog today to let you know that we have just added a new pattern to the In the Folds in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine pattern family!

While we’re all going crazy for easy-wearing sack dresses, we thought it was about time we created one for you!

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What is really fun about this design, is that you can wear it two different ways - depending on how you’re feeling / your style! The Everyday dress is a knee-length oversized reversible dress. One side of the dress has a soft v-neck, while the other has a round neck. The dress features relaxed boxy sleeves, inseam pockets, hem splits and an optional waist tie. A neck facing is used to finish the neckline, which gives a beautiful and clean finish, as well as a lovely detail on the neckline.

The pattern is available in 10 sizes (approximately AU size 6 - 24) and comes as a layered PDF so you can just download the size that you need. More information about In the Folds sizing can be found here.

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Through the creation of this garment you will gain confidence in:

  • sewing with woven fabrics

  • sewing in-seam pockets

  • sewing facings

  • sewing a hem split

As always, the instructions are very detailed, so I’ll be there to hold your hand every step of the way!

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The Everyday dress is compatible with light to mid-weight fabrics. Consider using: cotton, linen, viscose / rayon, chambray or silk. We used smoke chambray linen from The Fabric Store for ours.

Please note: due to the width of the pattern pieces, you will need to use 150cm (60in) wide fabric (or wider).

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The pattern can be downloaded in both A4 and A0 format. This is a great pattern for advanced beginners and beyond. 

I’d love to hear what you think!

Happy sewing lovely people.

Flynn jacket : Remove box pleat

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Welcome back to the pattern adjustment series for the Flynn jacket!

I thought some of you might be interested in how to remove the box pleat from the Flynn jacket View A (sleeve version), and have it have a flat back like View B (sleeveless version). This is a really quick alteration to make and won’t take you longer than a couple of minutes.


Step 1

FLYNN - remove pleat-01.jpg

Take the BACK [2] and mark a vertical line down through the pattern - starting at the notch on the neckline that indicates the pleat stitch line - and drawing to the bottom of the pattern piece (through the drill hole marking). Be sure to keep the line parallel to the centre back.

Step 2

FLYNN - remove pleat-02.jpg

A - Cut along the line marked in STEP 1 to remove the pleat.

B - You will now be able to use the BACK HEM FACING [10] from View B. All you need to do is transfer the notch on to the top edge of the BACK HEM FACING [10] to the bottom edge of the BACK [2]. For more details on transferring notches - check out this post.


I hope you have enjoyed these posts! If there is a tutorial that would like to see, that wasn’t in the series, please leave me a comment or send me an email.

Posts in the series:

Flynn jacket : Narrow / broad shoulder adjustment

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Welcome back to the fitting series for the Flynn jacket!

Today we will be talking shoulder adjustments.

View B of the Flynn jacket is sleeveless and you will want the shoulder seam to end on the tip of your shoulder. (You might want to adjust View A (version with sleeves) for broad or narrow shoulders, but it will be more likely you will need it for the sleeveless version, so that is what I will be focusing on today).

If you have made a toile / muslin and noticed that the end of the shoulder seam is sitting beyond the tip of your shoulder, you may choose to do a narrow shoulder adjustment.

If the end of the shoulder seam does not reach the tip of your shoulder, you may choose to do a broad shoulder adjustment.


Step 1

FLYNN shoulder adjustment SMALL-01.jpg

Take the FRONT [8] pattern piece. You can use the original piece or trace a copy of it - depending on your preference. If you do choose to trace a copy, be sure to also trace the stitch line (the grey line on the pattern) of the shoulder seam and armscye.

A - Mark a point halfway along the shoulder (on the stitch line). Mark another point, approximately one third of the way down the armscye. Join these two points with a straight line running through the pattern piece [Line 1].

B - Join the corner of the shoulder and armscye to Line 1 with another line, this will be Line 2. Check that Line 2 is perpendicular to Line 1.

Step 2

FLYNN shoulder adjustment SMALL-02.jpg

A - Cut along Line 1, starting at the shoulder. Slow down as you approach the stitch line on the armscye. Stop cutting 1-2mm from the stitch line (indicated by the blue dot in the illustration).

B - Cut in from the other side of the line (through the seam allowance on the armscye), again stopping 1-2mm from the stitch line. This will create a small “hinge” that will allow the sections of the pattern to move quite flexibly without become detached.

FLYNN shoulder adjustment SMALL-03.jpg

A - Cut along Line 2, starting at the point that you just cut. Slow down as you approach the stitch line at the corner. Stop cutting 1-2mm from the stitch line (indicated by the blue dot in the illustration).

B - Cut in from the other side of the line (through the seam allowance on the corner), again stopping 1-2mm from the stitch line. This will create a small “hinge” that will allow the sections of the pattern to move quite flexibly without becoming unattached.


Broad shoulder adjustment

FLYNN shoulder adjustment SMALL-04.jpg

A - Take a piece of scrap paper and place it behind the shoulder section of the FRONT [8].

B - Carefully swing open the pattern (at the place that was Line 1), using the hinge to help you.

C - Measuring from the main section of the pattern piece (not the unattached triangles), mark the amount of width you would like to add to the shoulder. Remember to mark this on the stitch line and not the seam allowance line.

FLYNN shoulder adjustment SMALL-05.jpg

A - Use the hinges to manoeuvre the triangles back towards the shoulder. Line up the stitch line on the triangle with the mark you made in the previous step. You will notice that this requires the triangle sections to overlap.

B - Once the triangles are lined up with the point and all sections are sitting nice and flat, tape or glue in place onto the paper underneath.

FLYNN shoulder adjustment SMALL-06.jpg

Re-draw the seam lines - both the shoulder and the armscye - using a ruler (and a french curve if you have one).

Re-cut the pattern, removing the excess paper.

Repeat the process on the back piece.

Take the ARMHOLE FACING [11] piece and transfer the changes to the pattern piece.


Narrow shoulder adjustment

FLYNN shoulder adjustment SMALL-07.jpg

A - Take a piece of scrap paper and place it behind the shoulder section of the FRONT [8]. Carefully swing open the pattern (at the place that was Line 1), using the hinge to help you. On the main section of the pattern piece (not the unattached triangles), mark the amount of width you would like to remove from the shoulder. Remember to mark this on the stitch line and not the seam allowance line.

B - Use the hinges to manoeuvre the triangles back towards the shoulder. Line up the stitch line on the triangle with the mark you made. You will notice that this requires the triangle sections to overlap.

C - Once the triangles are lined up with the point and all sections are sitting nice and flat, tape or glue in place onto the paper underneath. Re-draw the seam lines - both the shoulder and the armscye - using a ruler (and a french curve if you have one). Re-cut the pattern, removing the excess paper.

Repeat the process on the back piece.

Take the ARMHOLE FACING [11] piece and transfer the changes to the pattern piece.


Keep your eyes out for more posts over the coming days!

During this series I will show you how to:

Flynn jacket : Full bust adjustment

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The Flynn jacket is intended to have a substantial amount of design ease, to create an oversized shape, designed for layering. For this reason, I suggest focusing on your high bust measurement when selecting your size. The size chart for the Flynn jacket can be found here.

This pattern is drafted for a B cup bust. Due to the large amount of ease, it is unlikely you will need to do a full bust adjustment (or small bust adjustment) for View A. Check the finished garment measurements to ensure it will fit through the waist and hip.

For View B, which is closer fitting, due to its sleeveless nature, you may consider this alteration to achieve a better fit through the shoulders and armhole (and also so you can close it, if you would like to add a hook and eye). For today’s post, I will get you started for doing the adjustment and then will link to a past post that I wrote about full bust adjustments.

WHEN YOU'LL NEED TO DO A FULL BUST ADJUSTMENT 

Most indie pattern companies (including In the Folds) draft for a B cup bust. There are of course exceptions to this rule (such as Cashmerette and Colette Patterns), so make sure you check on your pattern before assuming the bust cup size.

In terms of the Flynn jacket, it is a loose style which means it is a little more forgiving than more fitted patterns (such as the Acton, for example) so in some cases you can probably get away with not making a bust adjustment. For example, if your bust is smaller than a B cup, it is unlikely you need to bother doing a Small Bust Adjustment. I have an A cup bust, but have not made adjustments to any of my Flynn jackets. Also if your bust is just slightly bigger than a B cup, it is also likely you will be okay without the adjustment.

Check the finished garment measurements and go from there. 

WORK OUT YOUR CUP SIZE

Your cup size in sewing patterns may not always correspond to the bra size you wear. To be safe, check your measurements before deciding if you need to make any adjustments to the pattern. 

To do this, measure your high bust measurement (the area above your breasts, under your arms) as well as your full bust  (the fullest part of your chest) and then take note of each measurement, as well as the difference.

If the difference is 2.5cm (1") your bust is an A cup, 5cm (2") it's a B cup, 7.5cm (3") is a C cup and so on. 

CHOOSE YOUR SIZE

Now, go back to your high bust measurement and add 5cm (2"). This is what your bust measurement would be if you were a B cup and therefore the size you should be choosing from the pattern.

For example, let's say your upper bust measures 81cm (32"). Add 5cm (2") to this measurement to find out what size your bust measurement falls into on the In the Folds sizing chart (and what size you would be if you had B cup breasts). 81cm + 5cm = 86cm which corresponds to a size C. Your actual bust measurement is 89cm  though - 3cm (1") larger than the cup size of the pattern. This means you need to do a FBA and add this 3cm (1") to your pattern. 

As the front pieces are cut as a pair, you need to take the measurement you will be adding and divide it by two. For example, this 3cm (just over 1") mentioned in the example, will be split between either side of the front - 1.5cm (1/2") on each side. 


Step 1

FLYNN FBA-01.jpg

For the sake of the example, I will be making the adjustment to the pieces of View B (as this is the style most likely to require the adjustment), but you can follow this tutorial for View A too.

Take the two pieces that make the front of the Flynn jacket - the FRONT HEM FACING [5] and the FRONT [8]. The first step will be to turn these pieces into one pattern piece (removing the panel line) as this will make the adjustment much easier to manage. At the end, we'll put the panel line back in place, so there won't be any change to the design (except for the addition of the dart - which can be removed later on, if you prefer). 

Step 2

FLYNN FBA-02.jpg

A - Take the SIDE FRONT [8] piece and place it on top of the FRONT HEM FACING [5], lining up the stitch lines (the grey line on the pattern), as if the pieces have been sewn together. If you are struggling to see the lines, it can help to put the pieces up to a window and see through the paper that way (or a lightbox, if you have one). Once the pieces are correctly lined up, use masking tape (or similar) to hold the pieces in place. 

As you can see in the example, you won’t be able to align the stitch line for whole seam, as the lines slightly change directions towards the shoulder (which is what gives you a nice shape in that area). Just focus on lining up the stitch line in the lower section of the pattern (as illustrated).

B - Take a piece of pattern paper and trace the piece - being sure to include all pattern markings (in this case: the grainline and notches). Also trace the panel line.

Make sure you trace both the cutting line and the stitching line - this is really important. In the Folds patterns include the stitching line on each pattern piece so that it is easier for you to make alterations to your pattern. I know we would all love to be able to cut a pattern in a straight size and for it to fit perfectly, but unfortunately that's not the way it is (I even have to make adjustments to In the Folds patterns so they fit my figure properly), so having the stitch lines can help you make adjustments more quickly and easily. When making pattern alterations, I normally suggest removing the seam allowance, but because the stitch line is marked on the pattern, you can leave it on. 

From this point you are ready to make the adjustment. Head over to this tutorial - starting at STEP 3 and work through the tutorial.


Keep your eyes out for more posts over the coming days!

During this series I will show you how to:

Flynn jacket : Shortening / Lengthening the sleeves

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Today in the Flynn jacket pattern alteration series, I will be showing you how to lengthen or shorten the sleeves.

There are times when you can just add some (or remove) length to the hem of a sleeve (when the underseams of a sleeve are straight), but in the case of the Flynn jacket (and other patterns like it), you need to add/remove the length to the inside of the pattern piece, so that you can keep the shape intact - due to the tapered nature of the sleeve. As well as this, the Flynn jacket sleeve is finished with a hem facing, so by adding / removing length from the inside section of the sleeve, the hem facing will still fit and will not require any changes.


Lengthening the sleeve

Step 1

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Take the SLEEVE [3] pattern piece. You can use the actual pattern piece, or trace a copy if you would prefer to keep the original piece intact.

Step 2

LENGTHENING FLYNN-SMALL-01.jpg

You will need to work out how much length you would like to add to the sleeve. You can do this by looking at your toile / muslin (for more details on making a toile / muslin look at this post from the Rushcutter sew-along), or holding the pattern pieces up to your body and getting an idea of where they will sit on your arm (keep in mind that the jacket has a dropped shoulder and the sleeve cap does not sit at your shoulder point).

A - Cut through the lengthen/shorten line on the SLEEVE [3].

B - Take the upper section of the sleeve, and tape or glue a piece of paper to the lower section - with enough paper extending past the pattern to add your length extension. Leave some paper either side too.

C - Extend the grainline onto the attached paper and then mark a horizontal line on each piece of paper, measuring down from the cut line the distance equal to the amount of length you would like to add. In the example above, you can see the red line is 5cm (2in) below the cut line (which is how much length we will be adding to the sleeve).

Step 3

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A - Attach the lower part of the sleeve to the added paper, lining up the cut edge with the line marked in the previous step. Use the grainline to ensure that you line the pieces up correctly.

B - Glue or tape in place.

Step 4

LENGTHENING + SHORTENING SLEEVE-SMALL-04.jpg

Re-draw the seam lines with a straight line over the adjustment.

You can choose to trace the pattern on to fresh pattern paper or tape on small pieces of paper / masking tape where you need to fill a small gap to complete the seam line.

Cut off any excess paper that is outside of the new lines.


Shortening the sleeve

Step 1

LENGTHENING + SHORTENING SLEEVE-SMALL-05.jpg

You will need to work out how much length you would like to remove from the sleeve. You can do this by looking at your toile / muslin (for more details on making a toile / muslin look at this post from the Rushcutter sew-along), or holding the pattern pieces up to your body and getting an idea of where they will sit on your arm (keep in mind that the jacket has a dropped shoulder and the sleeve cap does not sit at your shoulder point).

A - Cut through the lengthen/shorten line on the SLEEVE [3].

B - Measuring up from the cut line, mark a horizontal line on each pattern piece, the distance of the amount of length you would like to remove.

In the example, you can see the red line is 5cm (2in) above the cut line and the shaded section shows the amount of length that will be removed from the sleeve

Step 2

LENGTHENING + SHORTENING SLEEVE-SMALL-06.jpg

A - Move the lower part of each pattern piece up to the line marked in the previous step. Use the grainline to ensure that you line the pieces up correctly.

B - Glue or tape in place.

Step 3

LENGTHENING + SHORTENING SLEEVE-SMALL-07.jpg

Re-draw the seam lines with a straight line over the adjustment (you can cut off any excess paper that is now outside the lines).


Keep your eyes out for more posts over the coming days!

During this series I will show you how to:

Flynn jacket : Lengthening the pattern

LENGTHEN FLYNN.jpg

As I have just released a new pattern (yay for the new Flynn jacket), I thought it would be helpful to post a few tutorials about making alterations to the pattern. Yesterday I showed you how to shorten the pattern, so today I thought I would show you how to lengthen the pattern.

All In the Folds patterns are drafted for a height of 170cm (5'7") , so you might need to shorten or lengthen my patterns if you are taller or shorter than this height (although it does sometimes come down to preference).


GETTING STARTED

Step 1

SHORTENING FLYNN-01.jpg

The pieces you will need for this adjustment are the FRONT HEM FACING [5], FRONT [1] and BACK [2] (or the corresponding pattern pieces from View B). You can use the actual pattern pieces, or trace a copy if you would prefer to keep the original pieces intact.

Step 2

LENGTHENING FLYNN-SMALL-01.jpg

You will need to work out how much length you would like to add to the pattern. You can do this by looking at your toile / muslin (for more details on making a toile / muslin look at this post from the Rushcutter sew-along), or holding the pattern pieces up to your body and getting an idea of where they will sit on your body.

If you would like to add any more than 7.5cm (3in), I’d suggest adding 5cm - 7.5cm (2in - 3in) to the mid-section of the pattern (where the LENGTHEN / SHORTEN lines are) and then adding the remainder to the hem facing (more on this in STEPS 5 + 6).

Also keep in mind that by lengthening the pattern, you will be moving the placement of the pockets down. If you are lengthening the pattern to change the jacket into a longer style, I would recommend adding more length (or all length) to the hem facing (rather than the mid-section), or moving the pocket placement so they don’t become too low.

A - Take the upper part of each pattern piece, and tape or glue a piece of paper to the lower section - with enough paper extending past the pattern to add your length extension. Leave some paper either side too.

B - Extend the grainline onto the attached paper and then mark a horizontal line on each piece of paper, measuring down from the cut line the distance equal to the amount of length you would like to add. In the example above, you can see the red line is 5cm (2in) below the cut line (and 5cm length will be added to the pattern in the example).

Step 3

LENGTHENING FLYNN-SMALL-02.jpg

A - Attach the lower part of each pattern piece to the added paper, lining up the cut edge with the line marked in the previous step. Use the grainline to ensure that you line the pieces up correctly.

B - Glue or tape in place.

Step 4

LENGTHENING FLYNN-SMALL-03.jpg

Re-draw the seam lines with smooth lines over the adjustment. You will notice that in some cases you will be adding a little bit on to create the line of best fit, while in other cases you will need to shave a bit off. This will even out as you go around the pattern.

When marking a line over the area that has been altered, there might be a large gap between the two sides of the line. In this case - split the difference by marking a point in the centre of the area and drawing the line across this point.

You can choose to trace the pattern on to fresh pattern paper or tape on small pieces of paper / masking tape where you need to fill a small gap to complete the seam line.

Cut off any excess paper that is outside of the new lines.

Check all seams are the correct length by "walking" the pattern pieces, as if you were sewing them together. For more details on how to do this, check out this tutorial.

Transfer / re-draw any notches that have been misplaced. Due to the shape of the pieces, some notches may not line up due to the different points the alteration was made. After checking that the seam is the correct length, transfer one notch to the other piece (and cross out the notch that is no longer in the correct position).

If you need to add more than 7.5cm (3in) and have opted to add some length to both the mid-section of the pattern and the hem facing, continue to STEP 5. Otherwise, you are ready to cut your fabric with your new altered pattern pieces!

Step 5

LENGTHENING FLYNN-SMALL-04.jpg

A - To add more length to the jacket, mark a horizontal line through the bottom section of the FRONT HEM FACING [5] and the BACK FACING [6]. Make sure the lines are perpendicular to the grainline. When making alterations like this, I try to stay away from notches when possible, so advise that you draw you horizontal line slightly above, or slightly below, the notches on the side of each piece.

B - Check the position of the grainline in relation to the horizontal line you just marked. If the grainline does not cut through the horizontal line, extend the grainline (as I have done on the FRONT [5] in the example). This will help you keep things straight when making the adjustment.

Cut through the horizontal line and stick a piece of scrap paper to the lower section of each pattern piece.

Step 6

LENGTHENING FLYNN-SMALL-05.jpg

A - Again, attach the lower part of each pattern piece to the added paper, lining up the cut edge with the line marked in the previous step. Use the grainline to ensure that you line the pieces up correctly.

B - Glue or tape in place.

C - Re-draw the sides that have been impacted and check that the notches still line up correctly.


And that’s it! You’re done!

During this series I will show you how to:

Flynn jacket : Shortening the pattern

SHORTEN FLYNN.jpg

As I have just released a new pattern (yay for the new Flynn jacket), I though it would be helpful to post a few tutorials about making alterations to the pattern.

If you’re shorter than 170cm (5'7") this tutorial might be a good one for you! All In the Folds patterns are drafted for this height, so you might need to shorten or lengthen my patterns if you are taller or shorter than this height (although it does sometimes come down to preference).

There are a couple of other reasons why you might also want to do this adjustment to the Flynn jacket:

  • You might be 170cm (5'7") but have a shorter torso and longer legs than the pattern was designed for

  • You would prefer more of a cropped style than the original design

The Flynn jacket is designed to finish at the top of the thighs (and just below your bum at the back). Due to the design of the hem band and curved front panel, you can’t just simply cut length off the bottom of the jacket pattern as it will change the proportions of the jacket. Instead, you need to take length out from the middle of the pattern pieces, so that the proportions remain intact, and today that is what I am going to show you how to do!

As is becoming quite common with my patterns, the Flynn jacket has some very unique panel lines. This means that making alterations to the pattern is slightly different to what you would need to do with a straight cut jacket. It’s not difficult at all, and the principle is the same, there is just a few extra steps you have to do!


GETTING STARTED

Step 1

SHORTENING FLYNN-01.jpg

The pieces you will need for this adjustment are the FRONT HEM FACING [5], FRONT [1] and BACK [2] (or the co-ordinating pattern pieces for View B). You can use the actual pattern pieces, or trace a copy if you would prefer to keep the original pieces intact.

Step 2

SHORTENING FLYNN-02.jpg

You will need to work out how much length you would like to remove from the pattern. You can do this by looking at your toile / muslin (for more details on making a toile / muslin look at this post from the Rushcutter sew-along), or holding the pattern pieces up to your body and getting an idea of where they will sit on your body.

If you would like to remove any more than 7.5cm (3in), I’d suggest taking 5cm - 7.5cm (2in - 3in) from the mid-section of the pattern (where the LENGTHEN / SHORTEN lines are) and then removing the remainder from the hem band (more on this in STEPS 5 + 6).

A - Cut through the 'LENGTHEN / SHORTEN' line on the FRONT HEM FACING [5], FRONT [1] and BACK [2].

B - Measuring up from the cut line, mark a horizontal line on each pattern piece, the distance of the amount of length you would like to remove. In the example, you can see the red line is 5cm (2in) above the cut line and the shaded section shows the amount of length that will be removed from the pattern piece.

Step 3

SHORTENING FLYNN-03.jpg

A - Move the lower part of each pattern piece up to the line marked in the previous step. Use the grainline to ensure that you line the pieces up correctly.

B - Glue or tape in place.

Step 4

SHORTENING FLYNN-04.jpg

Re-draw the seam lines with smooth lines over the adjustment. You will notice that in some cases you will be needing to add a little bit on to create the line of best fit, while in other cases you will need to shave a bit off. This will even out as you go around the pattern.

SHORTENING FLYNN-CLOSE-UP-04.jpg

When marking a line over the area that has been altered, there might be a large gap between the two sides of the line. In this case - split the difference by marking a point in the centre of the area and drawing the line across this point. You can choose to trace the pattern on to fresh pattern paper or tape on small pieces of paper / masking tape where you need to fill a small gap to complete the seam line.

Cut off any excess paper that is outside of the new lines.

Check all seams are the correct length by "walking" the pattern pieces, as if you were sewing them together. For more details on how to do this, check out this tutorial.

Transfer / re-draw any notches that have been misplaced. Due to the shape of the pieces, some notches may not line up due to the different points the alteration was made. After checking that the seam is the correct length, transfer one notch to the other piece (and cross out the notch that is no longer in the correct position).

If you need to remove more than 7.5cm (3in) and have opted to remove some length from both the mid-section of the pattern and the hem band, continue to STEP 5. Otherwise, you are ready to cut your fabric with your new altered pattern pieces!

Step 5

SHORTENING FLYNN-05-05.jpg

A - To remove more length from the jacket, mark a horizontal line through the bottom section of the FRONT HEM FACING [5] and the BACK FACING [6]. Make sure the lines are perpendicular to the grainline. When making alterations like this, I try to stay away from notches when possible, so advise that you draw the horizontal line slightly above, or slightly below, the notches on the side of each piece.

B - Check the position of the grainline in relation to the horizontal line you just marked. If the grainline does not cut through the horizontal line, extend the grainline (as I have done on the FRONT [5] in the example). This will help you keep things straight when making the adjustment.

Cut through the horizontal line in the same way you did in STEP 2.

Step 6

SHORTENING FLYNN-06-06.jpg

A - Again, measuring up from the cut line, mark a horizontal line on each pattern piece, the distance of the amount of length you would like to remove.

B - Move the lower part of each pattern piece up to the line marked. Use the grainline to ensure that you line the pieces up correctly.

C - Re-draw the sides that have been impacted and check that the notches still line up correctly.


And that’s it! Not too tricky, right?

In the following days I will show you how to:

Introducing the Flynn jacket!

INTRODUCING FLYNN.jpg

I am very excited to let you know that the Flynn jacket is here! As always, this pattern has been a long time in the works (I have been wearing one of my early samples for 2 years!!) and I am over the moon to be able to finally share it with you.

As I slowly add to the In the Folds pattern collection, it’s incredible to see how the pieces all work together. I don’t necessarily design new patterns thinking about collections and how everything will work together, but thankfully my aesthetic and style seems to be pretty consistent and each time I add a new piece to the collection I am thrilled to see how it fits in with the existing patterns. You will see the Flynn jacket paired with the Darlow pants and Collins top through this shoot, and see that they are a perfect match!

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The Flynn jacket is a loose-fitting jacket designed for woven fabrics. With two different styles, it is the perfect layering piece for autumn and winter (and maybe even spring).

One of the things I have struggled with most, when it comes to releasing my patterns, is releasing my patterns on time! I am chuffed to finally release a pattern at the perfect time of year (well at least for those of us down here in the southern hemisphere).

As it’s just cooling down here in Sydney, the Flynn jacket has now become one of my most worn pieces in my wardrobe again and I know I will be wearing it all winter long (just with a few extra layers underneath). As you can see though, it works equally well in something lighter (above sample was made in organic cotton linen) for a trans-seasonal piece.

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The Flynn jacket (View A) has a dropped shoulder and sleeve with a hem facing. It also features an inverted box-pleat in the back.

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The Flynn jacket (View B) is sleeveless and features armhole facings for a really beautiful finish (and a fun new technique for you to learn). It has been designed to be worn over long sleeve tops and dresses, although works equally well in warmer weather over a sleeveless top or t-shirt.

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View B has a closer fit than View A, due to its sleeveless design and flat back piece (no box pleat).

The details

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The Flynn jacket features a kimono-style collar, a high-low hem and large in-seam pockets. The sleeves on View A are designed to be worn either straight or folded back, for a more casual look.

The panel lines that wrap around the jacket to create the collar, make for a really fun and satisfying sew.

Who is the pattern for?

I have placed the Flynn jacket at a 2 on the In the Folds skill scale - which means that before starting this project you should feel quite confident with the basics and be ready for new challenges. I know the idea of making a jacket can be a little intimidating for advanced beginners or intermediate sewists, but the Flynn jacket is a great entry level jacket to sink your teeth into, as you don’t have to worry about lining and due to it’s oversized silhouette, it is easy to achieve a good fit.

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On both views, all seams are finished with bias binding, for a beautiful and high-end finish. This means that not only will you end up with a beautifully finished jacket, you will also learn some new skills in the process!

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The Flynn jacket can be worn open, or closed discreetly with a hook and eye.

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What the testers said about this pattern:

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‘ I need hours to make any garment. But with yours, taking time is part of the task. You never mention how long this will take until completion and it just gives me a completely different feeling during the process. I enjoyed taking the time to make a flawless, beautiful jacket vest and could not be more proud of the perfect curves and impeccable insides. Stretching myself to make matching bias binding was really nice, too!’ - Julia

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‘The STYLE LINES knocked me out. I adore the swooping front piece with the enclosed large pockets. Very 20s-30s. I love the finishing with the bindings, but I am a former costumer, so neither of these points is surprising. Haha! Also - SO COMFY.’ - Myra

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‘Because of my fabric choice, the jacket is very structured and sculptural. I LOVE THAT. I absolutely love the binding (I like wearing blazers, and am a sucker for hong kong finished seams), especially when the jacket is left open, and the wind makes my binding peak out from the facing. Probably my favourite features are the big pockets and the style lines in the front… The instructions were so clear and well illustrated that even my non-sewing husband said he could make the garment himself.’ - Emilia

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For your reference, the model Marisabel wears a Size F.


Would you like to sew along with me?

I have recently started exploring the idea of running online sew-alongs as an opportunity for a group of us to work through a pattern together. Not only is it a great opportunity to set time aside to sew, but it is also a way to connect with other makers and learn from others.

A few months ago I ran my first online sew-along with the release of the Darlow pants. I loved getting the chance to get to know lots of different makers from all over the world and sew our Darlows together, so I have decided to do it again for the Flynn jacket.

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The sew-along will run in a Facebook group for 3 weeks from Friday May 24 - Friday June 14. This means you will have a few days to get the pattern printed, organise your fabric and read through the instructions, before we get started on Friday May 24.

What is an online sew-along?

Many different pattern companies run sew-alongs, so there is countless formats and ways this can be done. As mentioned, this is something I am currently experimenting with and working out what shape / format works best for me and my customers.

If you would like to take part, here are some things to note:

  • There are no formal lessons or classes. It is just a way for us to connect as a group and encourage and support each other to work through the same garment. You can take it as fast or slow as you like, and can spend as much (or as little) time in the Facebook group as you feel comfortable.

  • In the first week we’ll introduce ourselves and support each other to pick a size and make a toile. I will also do my best to connect people to others in the group with similar fitting concerns so we can work through our pattern adjustments together.

  • I will be sharing posts on my blog for alterations like shortening and lengthening and links to other resources that I think you might find helpful.

  • I will be in the group to offer feedback and advice and will encourage others to do the same. As we will all be in different time-zones, it’s nice to know that while I’m sleeping here in Sydney, someone in the northern hemisphere will be around to have a chat with for others in that part of the world!

  • There is no deadline. Although I will be encouraging makers to make the jacket in the three weeks specified - there is no problem if you can’t get it done. The reason I set a deadline is that I know some people like a little nudge like this that makes them accountable. It is also a realistic amount of time that I can dedicate to checking in on a group daily.

  • If you took part last time (for the Darlow pants sew-along), you will know we used Slack for the sew-along. As this is still a work in progress, I’m exploring options and seeing what the best way / format is to run these groups, so will be trying this with a Facebook group this time. I apologise to those of you who don’t use Facebook.

I hope you are as excited about the Flynn jacket pattern as I am!

Makers for Fashion Revolution 2019

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I can’t believe that Makers for Fashion Revolution (#makersforfashrev) is in it’s fourth year! What started out as a little post on Instagram that I hoped might encourage a few makers to consider the impact of making their own clothes on the environment and society on a broader level, has become a movement. The hashtag now has over 5000 posts and is a treasure trove of inspiring and thought-provoking posts.

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What is Makers for Fashion Revolution?

If you are new around these parts, you may be asking ‘What is Makers Fashion Revolution?’ Makers for Fashion Revolution is a movement I started in 2016 as a way to promote the larger movement of Fashion Revolution. Fashion Revolution was born on the day 1138 people were killed in the collapse of the Rana Plaza factory in Bangladesh. The mission behind the movement is, “We want to unite people and organisations to work together towards radically changing the way our clothes are sourced, produced and consumed, so that our clothing is made in a safe, clean and fair way.” For more information about Fashion Revolution, check out their website.

You can also read more about it on my blog here and here.

This cause is a very important one, and in 2016 I decided it was important for the sewing community to become involved in it too. As makers of our own clothing we are in a position to ask where our fabrics are coming from, who is impacted by the clothing we make and what the most sustainable practices available to us are.

To promote this cause and encourage people to ask more questions and think more deeply about what a cleaner and more sustainable fashion industry would look like, I will be posting prompts each day of Fashion Revolution Week. This will give you a chance to learn more about what you can be doing to lessen your impact on people and planet, as well as give you a chance to start important conversations with other fashion revolutionaries.

Are you in? If you would like to be, all you need to do is post the below image on your Instagram with the hashtag #makersforfashrev and keep your eye on my Instagram for the daily prompts.

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New pattern in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine : Wrap skirt

Free Wrap skirt pattern - Peppermint mag collab

In all the excitement of releasing the Darlow pants, I forgot to let you know that I just released a new pattern in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine. So I am popping in today to introduce you to the Wrap skirt! I have a feeling that this one is going to be really popular, as it’s a quick and easy sew for makers of all levels. And, as always, it’s available for free downloaded.

The pattern is available in 10 sizes (approximately AU size 6 - 24) and comes as a layered PDF so you can just download the size that you need.

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The Wrap skirt is a three-quarter length skirt with a waist tie, that sits on the natural waist. The skirt features front and back waist darts, french seams and a buttonhole to feed the waist tie through.

Free Wrap skirt pattern - Peppermint mag collab 2

Through the creation of this garment you will gain confidence in:

  • sewing with woven fabrics

  • sewing darts

  • sewing french seams

As always, the instructions are very detailed, so I’ll be there to hold your hand every step of the way!

Peppermint wrap skirt - free pattern

The Wrap skirt is compatible with a wide range of fabrics. For a soft silhouette, consider using: lightweight cotton, linen, viscose / rayon or silk. For a more structured silhouette, consider using mid to heavy-weight fabrics such as: cotton drill, linen, denim or wool. For the sample, I used a beautiful mid-weight linen from The Fabric Store.

The pattern can be downloaded in both A4 and A0 format. This is a great pattern for beginners and beyond. 

The Darlow pants pattern is finally here!

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I am ecstatic to be here today to release my newest pattern! I know I say this every time, but this has been a very long time in the works.

The story of how they came to be

The Darlow pants were designed in their first incarnation when I was in my final year of university, back in 2011! I was experimenting with the way panels could wrap around the body and could subvert the shapes and details of traditional clothing shapes.

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When I started In the Folds, I kept thinking back to those pants and wondering if there was a way to work with the same idea but adapt them to a more commercial design. Although I loved the original design, they were a bit too “high-fashion” (aka bizarre) and I couldn’t imagine them appealing to the masses. I got to work, starting with the original pattern and then diluting the details of the design. There was a lot of volume in the thigh and leg area, so I started by reducing that. My design practice always starts out with a basic idea of what I’d like to make and then involves cutting the pieces, sewing them together, looking at it on the body and then re-working… over and over again. So by starting with the original pattern, I just begun removing some volume and then re-toiling and seeing how it looked on the body. I don’t like to make drastic changes and prefer to slowly change the details - re-toiling and then checking how it looks. I really love this way of working (although it’s very slow) as it means it is totally informed by the shape of the body and how the bodyworks (and feels) in the garment. All this is to say, I have made these pants, in all their many forms, countless times (which is the case for all of the patterns I have released so far). I finally came up with a shape that I was happy with (View A) and that’s when I designed View B. This is generally how I go about designing patterns - I make sure I have one style that I love and then I tweak the design elements to make the alternate view. I really like the challenge of designing within the constraints of the first design. The goal is to bring in new features and new sewing techniques, without the addition of too many new pattern pieces.

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When I design patterns, I am always thinking about the skills I would like makers to gain / brush up on by working through the pattern. Although the Darlow pants are far from conventional in look or construction, I did want to teach some of the main techniques used in pant making. For this reason I included a fly front, tailored waistband and pockets (in-seam on both styles and patch pockets on View A and welt pockets on View B). I spent a lot of time making sure the instructions for the fly front and welt pocket were spot on. I know a lot of sewists are daunted by these two things, so I wanted the instructions to be crystal clear so that makers could understand the process and not feel overwhelmed by them. Although this pattern is a little trickier than my previous releases, it is a skill builder and I know you are going to feel really satisfied when you finish sewing them!

The details

So now that you know how I went about designing the Darlow pants, I would love to introduce them to you in more detail!

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The pants sit on the natural waist and feature a fly front with concealed zip closure, shaped waistband, in-seam pockets, back pockets and hem facings. The Darlow pants are designed to be quite fitted through the waist and hip, before more volume is added through the leg, for an interesting shape.

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View A has slightly more volume through the leg than View B, and features patch pockets, while View B has back welt pockets and panel lines through the back section. Both views comprise a number of interesting shaped panel lines that encourage a unique shape and an interesting experience.

For your reference, the model Marisabel wears a Size F.

The panel lines are no doubt what make this pattern special. They make for an interesting finished pair of pants, but more importantly an interesting making experience for all of you! I like that the panel lines can be as obvious or as subtle as you like, as you can see from the shoot samples - when made in black or white, you can get a sense of the panel lines, without them being the main event. I have illustrated over the photos below so that you can get a better sense of the panel lines and how they work on the body.

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I was a bit nervous about sending this pattern out into the world when it was time for testing. It is my most ambitious pattern to date and is slightly riskier in design than my previous releases. I was ecstatic (and relieved) when feedback started rolling in and it wasn’t just me that loved the experience of making these pants! I will be sharing the tester versions of the pattern on the blog next week, so keep your eye out for that!

What the testers said about this pattern:

‘I really felt like I was using my brain and levelling up my sewing skills. I only started sewing this year and the only pants I have made are culottes so it was a challenge but a very satisfying one.’ - Megan

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‘This pattern (and In The Folds patterns in general) just irradiates how much thought and detail went into it. I love that the result is a beautiful garment that reminds me to be mindful of the making process and that I will wear for many years… I liked that as I knew I was never going to be able to make them in one day, I took my time and made them in small portions. That way I saved myself a lot of pressure and stress. Also, inserting the fly was the least stressful experience I've had so far when making pants, I think I will stick to this method from now on.’ - Kamilla

‘I enjoyed the process of following the instructions exactly, it was great to let go and follow the processes. Also not knowing exactly what the style was, It was like magical mystery sewing tour… The instructions were great, very clear and easy to follow. Having the pattern pieces numbered made it even more clearer, well done. And all the illustrations were excellent too.’ - Alicia

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‘I love the fit of the pants! It's a fun and interesting style. I like how they're nicely fitted through the waist the hips and then have added volume below that. I think it's very flattering, while many other loose pants I've tried look overwhelming… I'm impressed with how well drafted this pattern is! When I cut it out, I was surprised by how many notches there were, but they were SO helpful. Everything fit together beautifully. This pattern seemed so well thought out, planned, and drafted. I was never stuck puzzling over what any instruction meant or how to sew my next step. I really enjoyed making the Darlow pants… The instructions for the welt pocket had a different approach to how I'd sewn them before, but I enjoyed your way. I also LOVED the instructions for the fly. It was easily the best description of how to sewn a fly that I've ever read.’ - Jaya

‘I loved the attention to detail, for example the bound inner waistband and the welt pockets. It was very satisfying seeing them come together over time.’ - Caroline

‘I Loved all your finishing choices...from the traditional fly front, to the welt pockets, bound waistband and hem facing. It felt a bit like I was sewing "couture"... This is definitely not a beginner project. It is, however, a great project to learn or practice skills that are often infrequently used by home sewers...like fly front and welt pockets!’ - Noreen


Would you like to sew along with me?

Last year I tested three patterns (the Darlows and two jackets that will be released later in the year). During testing I get to hang out with other makers online and learn more about them and their sewing journey and I loved every minute of it. After spending so much time working on my own, I just loved these interactions with makers. I know the online sewing community interacts a lot online, but this format felt very different to the way we engage in other spaces (such as Instagram etc.). It is a much more relaxed vibe and people seemed to be more comfortable to share their experiences and ask for help and advice than in other contexts. It got me thinking that I would love to have this experience more often and to be able to share it with more people.

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Because of this, I thought it would be fun to create an online group so that we can sew our Darlow pants together! The sew-along will be a workspace on Slack and will run for 3 weeks from Friday February 22 - Friday March 15. Places will be limited, so if you’re interested please purchase the pattern as soon as you can and sign-up for the sew-along (you will receive an email with a link to this after purchase). I will give you a few days to get the pattern printed, organise your fabric and read through the instructions and then we will get started on Friday February 22.

In the first week we’ll introduce ourselves and support each other to pick a size and make a toile. I will also do my best to connect people to others in the group with similar fitting concerns so we can work through our pattern adjustments together in week 2. In week 3 it will be time to get sewing! I will be in the group to offer feedback and advice and will pop links to tutorials etc. that will help along the way. One of the other things I love about pattern testing is the way we all come together to help each other and solve each others problems. My dream is that this works really well and I’ll be able to offer online sew-alongs for my other patterns - both new and old!

I hope you are as excited about the Darlow pants pattern as I am!

Saying goodbye to 2018

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I am one of those people (and I’m almost certain that a lot of you are too) that goes into reflective mode as the year draws to a close. I often wish I had the foresight and the hindsight that I have at the end of the year on a more regular basis (maybe monthly? Even quarterly would be nice!), but it seems that there is just something about the end of one year and the start of the other that makes us see things through a different lens.

Both 2017 and 2018 ended in somewhat similar ways. I barely took a break during the year and ended up feeling completely depleted of energy, inspiration and willpower by the time November rolled around. But then I did something that I felt I just had to do and these things gave me more energy and inspiration than I could imagine and got me through the final bit of the year.

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In 2017 it was launching a Kickstarter campaign, and this year it was Finders Keepers (a design market that took place in Sydney). Both these events were a much needed reminder that people see value in what I am doing and making and want to be a part of my vision. It can be easy to get totally lost behind the computer and all that we do day to day, but getting out from the studio and talking to people face-to-face always does me the world of good. I am always thrilled to see how excited people get and that they are will to show ip and be a part of it. These events were a reminder that I am part of a tribe - a tribe of incredible people that see the importance of making their own clothes, as well as a community of people who want me to succeed (thank you to the friends and family who are always jumping in to help!)

Me at Finders Keepers in Acton dress made from pre-loved vintage fabric.

Me at Finders Keepers in Acton dress made from pre-loved vintage fabric.

I am relieved that being part of Finders Keepers gave me the energy I needed to finish out this year, but it also made me think about how I’m doing things. I cannot rely on these external things to get me over the line and I have realised that I need to start thinking about the systems I use to get things done, so that I can work on avoiding these big highs and lows, as it is just too exhausting. Feeling as exhausted and burnt out as I did a month ago is not the reason I went into business and there is nothing glamorous about working to the point of complete exhaustion.

I had big plans for 2018 in both my business and personal life, and looking back, I achieved very few of them. There are a few things I am very proud of and have to acknowledge as highlights of the year / goals I achieved: I helped my partner make a drastic career change, which involved supporting him as he went to college and found a new job, I learned to run 5km (for anyone who knows me personally you know that was no small feat) and I got my sewing patterns into print and into the hands of stockists. I had an awesome launch party to officially bring my new printed sewing patterns into the world, and I packed up about 300 Kickstarter rewards and sent them out to the awesome people who backed my campaign. These were all big goals that I had to break down and work towards over a period of time and I am proud to say I got there with each one.

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But the thing I have been feeling a little down about is that I didn’t produce any new work (besides the patterns I released each quarter in collaboration with Peppermint magazine). Although just thinking about the patterns I made for Peppermint (photos below) makes me feel very proud and a little less defeated.

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When I first realised that I would see out the end of the year without releasing a new pattern, it was a difficult pill to swallow. I felt defeated and couldn’t imagine how a new year would fix this. But the more I thought about it, the more I realised that hitting this low about the nature of my output and my creative work is an important place to be. I needed to sit there in that horrible feeling for a while and let it wash over me. I needed to be there so that I can work on systems so this does not happen again. I don’t know if I would have gotten into this headspace without first realising how horrible I was feeling about where I was at. I am the first to say that creative work is not just about output and I do not believe that churning out patterns at the speed of light is what I should be aiming to do, but I do see the importance of producing patterns in a more consistent and regular way. I want to do this for my customers, but I also want to do this because it is the only way I can manage to create a sustainable income for myself in this line of work. And although I do love what I do, I do need to start thinking more about the numbers as I try to create a life that is a little more financially comfortable and stable.

As those of you who have been following along for a while would know, I tested three new patterns in 2018. That feels good to say. But for one reason or another, each of those patterns is not quite ready to be released. And instead of me facing what needed to be done on each pattern and getting it out into the world like I should have, I was tempted by the next shiny object (i.e. a new pattern) and would start on that. That’s the thing about running a small business, there is a million little things that you could spend your time doing each day and often it is difficult to work out what your priority should be - which thing is the most important. I often find myself just picking up the first thing that comes to my mind or is right in front of me - which generally is not the most important work.

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I recently made a hard decision. I decided that instead of pushing to get these three patterns out in a single release (which would hopefully generate more income, get them off my mind, excite the people who have been waiting for them) I will release each pattern separately, three months apart. Although this does extend how long these patterns have taken me to produce, the thought of getting ahead and seeing this as an opportunity rather than a failure has made me excited for 2019. It has given me hope that in 2019 I will do better than 2018, and I think that is what this whole small business thing is about. Learning new things, trying new things and growing both as an individual and a business. This choice has made me sit down and work on my processes and also get serious about what I can actually accomplish in a given hour, day, month or year. When I laid out all that I want to get done in a three month period, I suddenly realised that the expectations I have been putting on myself are far too high. I will do better in 2019, by being more realistic about my time and the expectations I put on myself. By seeing it all in front of me like this, I can also see that there will be times that I will need to ask for help, just to get projects over the line, and that’s okay. So now, instead of feeling like I hadn’t achieved some of the big goals I had set for myself for 2018, I am forgiving myself and feeling proud that although I didn’t release all the patterns I wanted to, I learned a great deal, nutted out my processes more and got myself prepared to do better next year. And most importantly, so many of you sewed my patterns this year, and just scrolling through the hashtags of the patterns I have released makes me eternally grateful to be part of this wonderful community.

Happy holidays everyone! I hope you have a relaxing break and can spend some time with with those you love and care about.

I’ll be taking two weeks off to relax, recoup and go camping! Any orders placed between now and January 8th will be shipped out when I’m back at work on January 9th, 2019. I appreciate your understanding.

Happy sewing everyone and thank you so much for supporting In the Folds this year. Seeing all your beautiful makes from my patterns has been an absolute highlight.

New pattern in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine : The Playsuit

Free Romper pattern - Peppermint mag collab

Yay! A new pattern is here and I am really excited to share it with you! This pattern is another one to add to the collection that I have released in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine. As always, the pattern can be downloaded for free! I really loved designing this pattern. It’s cute, fun and quite a simple sew (and getting the fit right isn’t too tricky due to the loose nature of the design and the tie-up straps).

The pattern is available in 10 sizes (approximately AU size 6 - 24) and comes as a layered PDF so you can just download the size that you need.

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The Playsuit is a comfortable and easy to wear summer staple with bib front and tie straps. The bust area has a close fit and then relaxes into the waist and hip area, for ease and comfort on warm summer days. The Playsuit features patch pockets, invisible zip (in the side for easy access) and an all-in-one facing for a clean and high end finish.

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As you can see, the Playsuit looks super cute on its own, but also works really well with a t-shirt underneath. As mentioned, the pattern isn’t too tricky and I’d say it’s a good confidence builder for beginner makers who would like to up their skills a little bit.

Peppermint playsuit free pattern

Through the creation of this garment you will gain confidence in:

  • sewing with woven fabrics

  • sewing an invisible zip

  • making straps

  • sewing a facing

  • sewing pockets

As always, the instructions are very detailed, so I’ll be there to hold your hand every step of the way!

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The Playsuit is compatible with a range of different fabrics. Consider using light to mid-weight fabrics such as: linen, linen blends, cotton, gauze or chambray. You could also consider sateen, silk (crepe de chine or habotai), tencel or viscose (rayon) for a dressier look. For a boxier silhouette, consider light-weight denims or heavy-weight cottons. For the sample, I used a beautiful heavy-weight linen from The Fabric Store. The pattern can be downloaded in both A4 and A0 format. This is a great pattern for brave beginners and beyond. 

In the Folds just turned three!

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Happy Friday lovely sewing friends!

I wanted to write a little post today about a big milestone I just reached, as I think it’s really important to celebrate when we can, right? Running a business is a hard slog and I think it’s good to stop and take stock for a moment sometimes. Especially when the milestone is an anniversary for your business! This past week marks three years since I started In the Folds. Yay!

First of all, I'd like to say a huge THANK YOU for supporting my business by purchasing my patterns and spreading the word on your blogs and social media about In the Folds patterns. Every day I am lucky enough to see garments made from my patterns and I will be forever grateful for that. When I started the business, I could never have imagined how many people would be making my patterns and that it would become a standard day to see multiple versions of a pattern shared on social media each day. What a dream!

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For any of you who has poured your heart and soul into running a business, you will know what a rollercoaster ride it can be. No two days are ever the same and suddenly you're having to learn how to wear all the hats. When I started this business I had envisaged spending all my days on my sewing machine, but the reality is that most of my time is spent behind my computer. Thankfully though, I get such pleasure and joy from the process, and although I'm not sewing as much as I'd like to, I hope all the work I put in to creating my patterns means you are spending more time at your sewing machine!

I like to think of anniversaries as a time to look back and celebrate the wins. It is so easy to get caught up chasing the next goal, without taking a moment to enjoy the achievement of reaching the last. I am incredibly guilty of this mentality, so I wanted to take pause on this significant milestone and share some wins with you!

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Some highlights from the last three years are:

  • Creating three sewing patterns under the name 'In the Folds.' Although this is nowhere near the number of patterns I had hoped to produce in this time, I am so proud of these patterns and the response to them so far. By creating these patterns I have learned so much, connected with so many people and really nailed my process and workflow. Hopefully over the next three years I can make many more!

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  • Creating ten sewing patterns in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine. When I started my business this was not part of the plan, but when I reached out to Peppermint Magazine to see if they needed a pattern maker, I was pleasantly surprised to hear that they were! This is a constant reminder that it's always worth it to just reach out. You never know what could happen!

    All these patterns are available for free download and this opportunity has definitely helped me get my name out there. It has been incredible to be able to provide free patterns to all of you so that you can give one of my patterns a go. It also gives me a chance to work on my processes and also my design skills, as it’s always a little different designing with a brief and a deadline (quite different to how I work for the patterns I release independently). These patterns have all been received really well and I love how timeless they all are. I hope to see many more versions in the future!

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  • Getting my patterns into print by running a successful Kickstarter campaign. This was by far the most challenging thing I have done so far in my business, but it was also the most rewarding. Seeing how much interest there was in my printed patterns was just what I needed to get this project over the line. It also gave me an opportunity to start wholesaling my patterns to stockists - which has been great. Thank you to all of those who helped me achieve this milestone - I could not have done it without you!

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  • Celebrating launching my printed patterns with an awesome party at The Fabric Store. I am so often celebrating my big milestones sitting behind a screen (like now), so it was amazing to be able to celebrate this one with friends - old and new - and do something really special to mark the occasion.

  • Being invited to tell my story on two podcasts. One in the early stages with Ani of Close Knit, and the other with Love to Sew podcast during my Kickstarter campaign.

  • And last but definitely not least, connecting with so many like-minded people both in person and online. Meeting you all has made me feel like I have the best job in the world!


To finish up, I'd love to say thank you for all your support and encouragement over the last three years, by gifting you with a discount code.

The code 'HAPPY20' will give you 20% off any of my digital patterns between now and Sunday October 28 at 11.59pm AEST. Happy sewing!

Would you like to pattern test for In the Folds?

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This poor little blog has been neglected of late. When I started In the Folds, I had the high hope of blogging regularly and consistently. I enjoy writing and I enjoy sharing my knowledge, so blogging has always felt like a good fit for me (I have had multiple blogs of different formats and styles over the last decade). I started off strong - posting a multitude of blog posts about sewing, pattern making and even a few behind the scenes style posts. So it has been sad for me to accept that there is just not enough hours in the day for me to blog at the pace I would like to. With drafting patterns (both for my business and my collaboration with Peppermint Magazine), all the administration that is involved in running a business, packing and sending orders, as well as my part-time job, there just isn’t time for it, which is why the only thing I seem to be blogging about lately is pattern testing! So I apologise in advance if you were hoping for new content and realised that it’s just another call for pattern testers! Although I am sure that a lot of you who missed out last time might be excited to see that there is an opportunity to get involved this time.

If you’re wondering how my upcoming pattern is going (the one I tested a couple of months ago and have not yet released), it is going… slowly! Overall, testing went really well and everyone really enjoyed using the pattern. But, as testing came to an end, I realised there was a recurring problem with one section of one of the variations. After doing some investigating I realised there was a drafting error that I had somehow overlooked. Although it’s really disappointing to realise something like this, it’s also a relief to catch it during testing (all thanks to my fantastic pool of testers), rather than after it had been released. I had to make adjustments to the pattern, re-sample to make sure it worked and then send the pieces back to the grader. I received the re-graded pieces this week, which is great, but it does mean that it has delayed the pattern shoot for this pattern. In the meantime, these jacket patterns came together and I realised I’d be better off shooting all three patterns at the same time - so that is the plan for now. I am also trying not to stress about it and just take the time I need. I am thankful that my designs are trend-adverse so I don’t have to worry about missing the boat in that respect!

Now back to the reason for this post. I am so excited to announce that I'm ready to test my two next patterns! Yes, you read it correctly… two patterns! As always, these patterns have been a long time in the works. I started playing with this jacket idea when I was in my last studio space - which means it has been in the works for about two and a half years! I rarely work on something consistently for a long time, as I feel within my process I need time to let things sit and develop. It can be frustrating at times, as I wish I could get patterns out a little quicker, but in the end I know this is what my point of difference is and what I feel makes my patterns special. I like to call this my patterns ‘brewing time.’

These two jackets started off as a single pattern, but over time I realised that the two styles had become so different that it no longer made sense to keep them as one. At first I was quite nervous about this decision, but over time I have realised that it made sense for me and my business. I think when you’re starting out you can get caught in the trap of adding more and more value - well at least I know I have found myself caught in that trap at times - thinking that to ask someone to spend money on something you’re making you have to give them everything you have possibly got. I realised through this process that the value of my work is not having 101 variations of a garment available, but is in the quality of the drafting, the usability of the pattern and the (very) detailed instructions that I always pour my heart and soul into. This is what I want my work to be known for and I need to constantly keep this at the forefront of my mind, as I make decisions about my products and how I choose to spend my time.

About the patterns

When I think about these two jacket patterns, I think of them as sisters. They have strong similarities, as they started from the same draft. The overall shape of each jacket is similar and they even share some pattern pieces. I am quite excited about this aspect as it means that the pieces can mix and match - a concept I have not yet explored through my pattern range. They also fill a gap in my pattern collection and work beautifully with all my current patterns, as well as other patterns I have in the works. I didn’t consciously do this, but have realised that this is probably quite natural as all my patterns really fit with my aesthetic and reflect the kind of clothes I like to wear, so it makes sense that in the end they would become a collection that evolves and grows over time.

If you have been following me on Instagram, you might have a pretty good idea about what one of these jackets looks like. During my Kickstarter campaign shoot, I didn’t realise I had left one of my toiles of this jacket hanging in the background (photo below - just in case you missed it)! I quickly realised what I had done when I was contacted by countless people asking where they could get the pattern. I guess in the end it was good market research and reinforced that it would be a popular pattern and worth working on… even if I did give more away than I normally would!

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I will give you the garment descriptions of the four jackets, and hopefully from that you will know if any of these styles are for you. Please only apply to test if you think the jacket is something you would like to wear. I am very conscious about all that I sew, and I hope you are too. I hate to think of garments being made and never worn, so be mindful of this, and if they don't sound like they're for you, there will always be next time. If you own other In the Folds patterns and they fit with your style, I’d say there is a good chance one of these patterns will be for you though!

Both jackets are loose-fitting and designed for woven fabrics. Each has two different styles and is the perfect layering piece for autumn and winter. 

Flynn jacket

The Flynn jacket features a kimono-style collar, a high-low hem and in-seam pockets. All seams are finished with bias binding, for a beautiful and high-end finish. Flynn can be worn open, or closed discreetly with a hook and eye. 

The Flynn jacket (View A) has a dropped shoulder and sleeve with a hem facing. It also features an inverted box-pleat in the back. The sleeves on View A are designed to be worn either straight or folded back, for a more casual look. 

The Flynn jacket (View B) is sleeveless and features armhole facings and a flat back piece (no pleat). It has been designed to be worn over long sleeve tops and dresses. I like to wear this style as an added layer to work, so that I always have pockets to make things easier. I’ve never owned a piece like this, so it has been interesting to see how it fits into my wardrobe. This version is more fitted through the bust and armholes than View A.

The Flynn jacket is compatible with bottom-weight fabrics such as: denim, cottons such as canvas, duckcloth and drill and heavyweight linens. 

The Flynn jacket is placed at a 4 on the In the Folds skill scale. For more info about this scale, look here.

Hove jacket

The Hove jacket features a fully lined hood, open-ended zip closure (or double-ended zip if you'd prefer), high-low hem, in-seam pockets and pleated back detail. 

The Hove jacket (View A) has a dropped shoulder and sleeve with a hem facing. This is the version that you can see in the photo. The sleeves on View A are designed to be worn either straight or folded back, for a more casual look. 

The Hove jacket (View B) is sleeveless (creating the look of a dolman sleeve) and is designed to be layered over long-sleeved tops and dresses. Armhole is finished with an armhole facing. This variation is loose fitting like View A.

The Hove jacket is placed at a 5 on the In the Folds skill scale. For more info about this scale, look here. This one is placed slightly higher than Flynn because of the zip.

The testing process 

I’ve learned through the last couple of pattern testing periods that the way I feel most comfortable pattern testing is by using a 'first in best dressed' model. This allows me to be as inclusive as I can be - giving everyone a fair chance to be involved in the process (and hopefully get some makers in the testing pool that have never had the chance to be part of the testing process). As well as making the process more inclusive, this also helps me out and ensures I can be spending my time on what is important. Pattern testing is a lot of work, any by selecting testers in this way, I will (hopefully) not be spending days going through applications and can just get the process started. 

I will need two sewists for each size for each pattern (one for each style) - meaning I need roughly 40 testers. This is the first time I have tested two patterns at once, so I am interested to see how it goes. This year I have been working on batching particular steps in my process, so I thought why not try batch testing. I already find pattern testing quite stressful, so doing two at once will hopefully limit the stress to a two week period, rather than a whole month of it! Fingers crossed my stress doesn’t double!

There is an application form at the bottom of this blog post. I have kept it as quick and as simple as possible and don’t require any more information than what is asked in the form. I will receive the applications in my email and will work through the applications from the first one I receive down, until all the positions are filled. I will favour brave beginners / intermediate sewists as this pattern is aimed at makers who are confident tackling a pattern of this level, but apart from that, everyone will have a fair chance of being involved.

The testing period will run for two weeks. I will let you know if your application has been successful by Tuesday October 23. At this stage I will add you to the Slack testing group and provide you with a copy of the pattern. Feedback will be due by Tuesday November 6. With feedback you will be expected to submit some simple photos of the garment being worn (at least front, back and side view). These photos do not need to be styled and will not be shared without your permission. Please only apply if this time frame suits you and you are happy to provide photos (they can be sent to me via email if you would prefer not to share them in the group).

HERE IS WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

  • Testing involves you making the garment - as it was originally intended (no pattern hacking etc.) and providing honest and constructive feedback on the making experience and finished garment. In exchange for your involvement, you will receive a free copy of the pattern on it's release. You will also have my sincere gratitude for being part of it! You are welcome to make fit changes to the pattern (such as shortening or lengthening etc.), just not styling changes.

  • Testing will run from Tuesday October 23 and will run for two weeks. Feedback and fitting photos (these don't need to be styled) will be due on Tuesday November 6. Please only apply if you can complete the project in the time frame.

  • Testing will be conducted through a Slack group, so please only apply to test if you are happy to join the group. I have found that testing in this way makes it much more fun for the testers, as you get to connect with other makers and sew the project together! It also means that if you have a question, there is a large knowledge pool that can get back to you (just in case it's night time here in Australia). In the past I have tested patterns using Facebook groups, but have realised over time that a lot of people don’t use Facebook and this does exclude some people. I have been using Slack with another group I am a part of, so I’m looking forward to seeing how it goes for this purpose! It will be a bit of a learning curve for me (and maybe for a few of the testers too).

HOW TO APPLY:

If you would like to apply, please complete the form below. Sizing info can be found here.

I am really looking forward to working with some of you, and hopefully meeting lots of new people in the process!


APPLICATIONS ARE NOW CLOSED

Thank you so much to all that applied! I really couldn’t do this without your help and support.

It's pattern testing time again!

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I'm so excited to announce that I'm FINALLY ready to test my next pattern! It has been a very long time since I've released a new pattern under the name In the Folds (rather than the patterns I release each quarter in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine) and I'm eager to share it with you all (you may have seen a few sneak peeks over the last couple of months on Instagram).

Why this pattern has taken so long for me to get this pattern out has been for a number of reasons: 

1. I make patterns at the pace of a snail - although this doesn't bother me too much as I'd prefer my patterns to be just right, rather than wasting anyone's time with a subpar pattern. It does mean though that unfortunately I am not in a position to release patterns as regularly as I would like.

2. The time it took to get my patterns into print - If you've been following along with me for a while, you'll know that last year I crowdfunded to raise money to get my patterns into print. It was an incredible, stressful, inspiring and exhausting process that was then followed by months of logistics to bring the project home. I plan to talk about the process more in the coming months on the blog, but for now the point is that the whole thing exhausted me for a good couple of months and I just couldn't bring myself to get a new pattern in the works.

But, in saying that, it is now time to test the next pattern. Yippee!!

I am very excited as this is pattern is a a solid intermediate pattern and will teach makers a range of new skills. I have laboured over the instructions long and hard to ensure that the instructions can guide makers through the process of a fly front and welt pockets. I'd like to put this pattern in the category of 'upskilling,' because I think this pattern is going to boost the confidence of lots of makers and also help you learn some things you may not have been game enough to try before, 

After trying out a new way of testing patterns (which I trialed the last time I tested) I've realised that the way I feel most comfortable pattern testing is by using a 'first in best dressed' model. This allows me to be as inclusive as I can be - giving everyone a fair chance to be involved in the process (and hopefully get some makers in the testing pool that have never had the chance to be part of the testing process). I will need two sewists for each size (one for each style) and I will work through the emails from the first one I receive down, until all the positions are filled. I will favour intermediate / advanced sewists as this pattern is aimed at makers who are confident tackling a pattern of this level, but apart from that, everyone will have a fair chance of being involved. As well as making the process more inclusive, this also helps me out and ensures I can be spending my time on what is important. Pattern testing is a lot of work, any by selecting testers in this way, I will (hopefully) not be spending days going through applications and can just get the process started. 

THE PATTERN

I don't want to give too much away, but will give you the garment description, and hopefully from that you will know if the style is for you. On that note, please only apply if you think these pants are something you would like to wear. I am very conscious about all that I sew, and I hope you are too. I hate to think of garments being made and never worn, so be mindful of this, and if they don't don't sound like they're for you, there will always be next time.

The Darlow pants are a cropped, tapered pant with a lot of interesting panel lines and details. They have been designed to give a new spin to the basic pant and can be worn as an easy and casual option or dressed up for a nice evening option.

The pants sit on the natural waist and feature a fly front with zip closure, shaped waistband, in-seam pockets, back pockets and hem facings. Darlow is designed to be quite fitted through the waist and hip, before more volume is added through the leg, for an interesting and flattering shape. Both comprise of a number of interesting shaped panel lines that encourage a unique shape and a fun making experience. 

This pattern is quite an involved sew, so I have allowed three weeks for testing (rather than the usual 2 weeks). If you are looking for a quick and easy pattern to sew up, I'd say this is not the pattern for you. In the Folds patterns are designed to encourage interesting and thought-provoking making experiences and this pattern is definitely in line with that goal. I have made these pants countless times and have fun each time I do it, but they are not a 2 hour make!

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View A has slightly more volume through the thigh and than View B, and features back patch pockets.

View B
View B is a bit more fitted through the leg and has back welt pockets

Suggested fabrics: The pattern is compatible with mid to heavy weight woven fabrics. Consider using: linen, linen blends, cotton drill, denim or wool. For a softer, more dressy silhouette, consider using heavy weight silk.  Keep in mind that View A has more volume in the thigh area and you may want to use mid-weight fabric (rather than heavy weight fabric) for this reason. 

HERE IS WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW:

  • Testing involves you making the garment - as it was originally intended (no pattern hacking etc.) and providing honest and constructive feedback on the making experience and finished garment. In exchange for your involvement, you will receive a free copy of the pattern on it's release. You will also have my sincere gratitude for being part of it!
  • Testing will run from Saturday, August 4 for three weeks. Feedback and fitting photos (these don't need to be styled) will be due on Monday, August 27. Please only apply if you can complete the project in the time frame.
  • Testing will be conducted through a Facebook group, so please only apply to test if you are happy to join the group. I have found that testing in this way makes it much more fun for the testers, as you get to connect with other makers and sew the project together! It also means that if you have a question, there is a large knowledge pool that can get back to you (just in case it's night time here in Australia). I know Facebook isn't everyone's best friend, but until I find an option that works as well as Facebook for testing, that is where it will take place. 

HOW TO APPLY:

If you would like to apply, please email testers@inthefolds.com - but before doing that, please continue reading. I will not accept applications that do not include the following information in the SUBJECT LINE.

All I need in the email is for you to put three key pieces of information in the subject line so that I can quickly and easily worth through the applications.

I need to know:

  1. Your size on the In the Folds sizing chart - to work it out look here. Your hip measurement is what you will use to select your size and then alterations will be made in regard to that to help you get a good fit. 
  2.  The style you would like to make - View A / View B / either view (details of each style can be found above)
  3. Your skill level. Please use this skill scale to place your current skills

So for example, you may write: Size C - view A - Level 5

And that's it. That's all I need to know! If you are applying, I will assume you agree to the time frame and being part of the Facebook group. 

I am really looking forward to working with some of you, and hopefully meeting lots of new people in the process!

New pattern in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine : The Ruffle Sleeve Top

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It's that time again! Time to release another pattern in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine! As you probably know by now, each quarter I release a pattern with Peppermint that you can download from their website for free.

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What I love about this collaboration is that it gives me an opportunity to design something that is a little simpler than my usual patterns, and it also allows you to try out my patterns for free. Win, win! To see the past patterns from the collaboration, look here (issues  30 - 37). 

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For this issue, we decided to make a simple top with a ruffle sleeve. I wanted it to be a piece that was both comfortable, yet still looks put together and chic. To do this, I went for a loose boxy shape, no closure (it just slips over the head) and a facing, to give the neckline a really clean finish. 

I thought it would be nice to encourage a few new techniques in this pattern, so the instructions guide you through making the top with french seams for a clean and professional finish. Although french seams do take a bit of time, they really will make your heart sing each time you look at the insides of your new top! If you would like to see a tutorial on sewing french seams, you can have a look here.

Through the creation of this garment you will gain confidence in:

  • sewing with woven fabrics
  • sewing darts
  • sewing french seams
  • sewing a facing
  • sewing gathers
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The Ruffle Sleeve Top is compatible with a range of different fabrics. Consider using light to
mid-weight fabrics such as: linen, linen blends, cotton, gauze or chambray. For a softer silhouette,
consider sateen, silk or viscose (rayon). Be careful if you are a beginner though, as these fabrics are a little trickier to sew. Softer fabrics will drape over the bust, while stiffer fabrics will create a more voluminous and structured silhouette. If using a sheer fabric, consider binding the neckline rather than using the facing. For the sample I used a beautiful cotton voile from our lovely sponsor for this partnership, The Fabric Store.

The pattern can be downloaded in both A4 and A0 format and comes with detailed instructions, so you will feel supported the whole way through. This is a great pattern for brave beginners and beyond. 

Printed sewing patterns are almost here!

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If you follow me on Instagram you will might have seen that I've been working on getting my patterns into print. It's a really exciting time for me and this little business and I am looking forward to sharing it all with you! I'll give you a few details in this post, but I look forwrad to doing some more behind the scenes style posts in the new year!

After a lot of thought and consideration, I decided that the best way to get my patterns into print would be by crowdfunding. I decided to go down this route as not only would it provide me with the opportunity to raise the funds required (printing sewing patterns is very expensive), it was also a chance to ensure that the products are actually in demand. I would have hated to spend a huge amount of time and money on patterns and then not be able to sell them! By crowdfunding, I could confirm the demand before pressing print. 

Preparing the Kickstarter campaign was a huge amount of work. On top of that it was a very stressful time, thinking about all the things that could go wrong and how I would proceed if I didn't hit my target. Luckily, I didn't have too long to worry as, within one week of launching the campaign, I reached my goal of $10 000. It all happened so quickly that I hadn't even had a chance to write about it on my blog! I had envisaged a month of hustling and slogging away to reach the target, but it all went surprisingly smoothly and I have been blown away by the level of support I have received for this project. It has most definitely validated the product and also given me a burst of energy I really needed to get this project over the line.

The goal of the campaign was to raise enough money to get my first run of patterns into print (The Ruschutter, The Acton and The Collins Top), but now that we've gone beyond that goal, I am very excited to say that new patterns will be available in print much sooner than I expected. By having the funds in the bank, I will be able to work on releasing new patterns on a more consistent basis, and I have all of you to thank for that! (All 241 of you - at the time of writing this post)!

 

If you haven't had the chance to back the project, there's still 14 days to go. You can learn more about it and make a pledge here. There are lots of great rewards, from patterns, to tote bags and even tickets to a launch event here in Sydney!

The other exciting thing that has happened lately is that I was interviewed on the Love to Sew podcast. It was so much fun talking to Helen and Caroline, and the best bit... I hit my Kickstarter goal while I was being interviewed! So if you want to gear that very special moment, then head over to the podcast and have a listen!

Until next time, happy sewing!

New pattern in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine : The Pleated Summer dress

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Yay! New pattern time! With the warmer weather here (at least here in Sydney), it's time for you to see the new pattern I made in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine for their most recent issue. I absolutely loved making this sample - I got to use a beautiful blush linen from The Fabric Store, and it was fun to make something a little more advanced than the things I've been sewing lately. 

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THE DETAILS

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The Pleated Summer Dress is a relaxed and boxy style dress, with a pleated skirt. It features a button placket, with hidden buttons, bias bound armholes and neckline, bust darts and a back yoke.

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Through the creation of this garment you will gain confidence in:

  • sewing with woven fabrics
  • sewing darts
  • sewing pleats
  • sewing a button placket

I'd encourage you to use a fabric that is soft and drapes well. Consider using light to mid-weight fabrics such as: linen, linen blends, cotton, gauze or chambray. For a softer silhouette, consider sateen, silk (crepe de chine or habotai), tencel or viscose (rayon). 

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The other thing that's very exciting about this issue of Peppermint Magazine is that there's a story about me and my business in it! Grab a copy if you'd like to have a read!

To see more of the patterns I've created in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine, head over to the shop

Go ahead! Grab the pattern, as always it's a freebie!

New Pattern in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine : The Jumpsuit

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You probably know by now that each quarter I make a pattern in collaboration with Peppermint Magazine. So far I have made six - the Jersey Dress (basically a doona in dress form, particularly useful for those of you in the Northern hemisphere who are about to go into the cooler months), the Peplum Top (this one has to be the most sewn pattern I've made by a long shot!), the Beach Cover-up, the Vintage-style Skirt, the Slouchy Cardi and the latest edition that was just released in the recent issue is the Jumpsuit.

What I love most about this collaboration is that it pushes me out of my comfort zone. I am not going to lie, I was a little nervous when I got the email from Peppermint telling me they'd like a jumpsuit pattern for the Spring issue. I am really not a jumpsuit kind of girl and I was worried about how I would bring the In the Folds aesthetic to the brief. But I think I managed! And I also surprised myself by falling totally in love with the sample and wishing it was mine to keep.

The details

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The Jumpsuit is a relaxed and loose fitting garment, perfect to wear day-to-day with a T-shirt underneath or dressed up with a pair of heels.

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The Jumpsuit features a v-neck front and back, bust darts for a beautiful fit across the bust, invisible zip, all-in-one facing and an optional waist sash for a more fitted silhouette.

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Through the creation of this garment you will gain confidence in:

  • Sewing with woven fabrics
  • Sewing darts
  • Sewing an invisible zip
  • Sewing an all-in-one facing
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I'd encourage you to use a fabric that is soft and drapes well. Consider using light to mid-weight fabrics such as: linen, linen blends, cotton, gauze or chambray. For a softer silhouette, consider sateen, silk (crepe de chine or habotai), tencel or viscose (rayon). 

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I am really hoping I get around to making one for myself this summer! I can imagine it being a workhorse of a garment that I could dress up or down and even layer it when the weather cools off again.

Go ahead! Grab the pattern, as always it's a freebie!